Tagged: Oakland

It keeps getting hotter!


The first half gets under way tonight in Chayi against the Elephants. When I joined the team in late May we were a couple games out of first place. Once June came around we had a lot of injuries and went on a bad losing streak. I believe we only won 4-5 games in June. I’m glad that the season is split into halves. It gives our guys hope and a fresh start to go forward trying to win a championship.

This past week I went back into Taipei, this time with my “physio” athlete trainer Patrick Hung. Patrick is one of two athletic trainers on the team who take care of the entire team. I told “patty-cake”, as the foreigners call him, to show me parts of Taipei a normal tourist wouldn’t think to go. We started on the red line of the MRT and headed to Guandu. There was a magnificent temple there where many locals come to pray. I wanted to take video to show the act of worship here, but I did not because I didn’t want to be disrespectful to anyones privacy during worship. It was very interesting though. There are individual rooms and statues for different types of worship. People will burn incense and bow and pray to their respective statue for certain help. Fruits, food, and other perishable goods are brought to the temple to show thanks. They also burn faux money in a fireplace for prayer.

Our next stop was to a natural preserve which was a huge mangrove park. There were crabs everywhere. These crabs were special and had one large claw and one small one. We then headed to Danshui which was like a large daytime street market. The air was filled with fresh cooked food ranging from pork, chicken, and squid. Many kids roamed around the boardwalk and played carnival style games. Ice cream seemed to be the biggest seller there. Everyone had cones with multi-colored ice cream over a foot  tall.

We then jumped onto a ferry and boated over to Bali. We rented bikes and rode about 10 miles to Shihsanhang. There was an amazing museum there which gave a rich history of the area and architecture. There was a lot of artifacts from the aborigines, which helped cultivate the area we were in.

This past week the Monkeys as a team visited a temple to take part in a ceremony to wish us luck going forward with the season. I’m hoping for less rain. We were rained out for four days straight last week trying to get our final make up game in.

This weekend we had a three game series with the Elephants. They finished the first half playing extremely well and are looking to make a push in the second half as are we. In our first game Ken Ray threw a complete game, but was the tough luck loser as the Elephants scored on a safety squeeze. He only gave up three hits in the game. We lost Friday 1-0.

Steve Hammond took to the mound on Saturday in Kaoushung and threw a gem. He went the distance and threw a nine inning shutout for us. We won 1-0.

On Sunday it was my turn to try to compete with our starters magnificent starts. I threw eight innings giving up two runs and we won 7-2. Our hitters gave me a lot of support with a handful of home-runs. Our defense was great behind me and my catcher called a great game. It was a huge team win especially to take two out of three games on the road. Thanks to all the fans for coming out to all the games. It really makes playing in front of them very exciting. They are cheering non-stop. I apologize for not being able to sign too many autographs after the game. Our team makes us get on the bus as soon as possible so that we can get on the road since we had a five hour drive back. We truly love all of your support, cheers, and signs.

Please share my blog with all your friends and fans. Feel free to ask questions or leave comments. I’m very excited for the second half and to help our team make it to the playoffs.

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Highlights from my last game Click HERE

 

 

Taipei, Jhongli, and ready to start the 2nd Half. Go Lamigo!


This past week went by fairly quickly although we only had two games at home. Mondays are usually off days in this league. This past week we only had games scheduled for Saturday and Sunday so we practiced at our home stadium Tuesday through Friday. Practice can be very different from the US. We open up with a 10-15 minute run around the warning track. Following that is a team stretch which also includes plyometric work. We then throw with the pitchers while the position players baserun. Once the position players are done running the bases, they get loose, while the pitchers will take ground balls in foul territory along the warning track. There is always something going on. There is no time to waste while at the ballpark. Pitchers will then get their pitcher fielding practice in as well as work cut offs, relays, bunt defenses, and backing up bases. Following all of that we break for lunch and set up for batting practice.

In the US batting practice is always disliked the most by the pitchers because no one enjoys shagging balls for hours. It is a little different here in Taiwan. They have over 300 balls to hit during batting practice which fill up three large crates. They also set up two cages on the field to multitask and get more work in. One side of the mound will be a pitching machine, while the opposite side will be a coach or player throwing live BP. Not many people shag balls because of the amount they have. A handful of pitchers will come out of the locker room in rounds and throw or hit a couple balls towards the middle of the field to help the clubhouse staff pick up the balls at the end.

This past Monday I ventured alone into Taipei. I was a little nervous at first getting around and learning my way, but it ended up being pretty easy. I took a cab over to the high speed rail which got me in to Taipei in 20 minutes. Normally is an hour and a half drive by car. From there I got onto the MRT (local subway) and shot over to the Taipei 101 building. This is the 2nd largest building in the world. The architecture on it is amazing and beautiful. Inside the 101 building is a mall whose stores inside put Miami, New York, and Beverly Hills to shame. Every luxury designer clothing, jewelry, and watch brand is in there. I even found it a little uncomfortable window shopping.

After the mall I shot back on the MRT to the Longshan Temple area. I visited the night market briefly. For those of you not familiar the night markets open up around 4/5pm everyday and can last until late into the night. You can get a ton of fresh cooked seafood and local treats like a carnival. They are all served street style and prepared right in front of you. There are vendors all over selling trinkets, to clothing, to electronics repairs, to knock off hand bags and watches.

My final stop of the evening was in Ximen. This is known as the Soho of Taipei according to my teams owner Justin, and he was correct. When I exited the subway, the lights across the street lit up my eyes. The buildings all had neon and flickering lights. The crowd was a younger group of kids into the latest trends and fashion. I came across a ton of awesome sneaker shops which made me love this area even more. I’m sure I will be back over there to check more of the stores out.

Finally, this week we have our two final make up games from the 1st half. We play Saturday and Sunday against the Elephants. Can’t wait for the 2nd half though. It was pretty cool to see how the fans and teams celebrate here when the Lions clinched the 1st half championship. Hopefully Lamigo will have a strong showing for the 2nd half. I hope to help us do that and we all thank you for the support. Thanks as always for reading and sharing my blog with your friends.

Be sure to leave comments and questions. I love receiving any feedback.

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You can also watch highlights from my last game here

101 Building in Taipei

Cool equipment over here and office guys going over the schedule

Team Weight room

Leeche fruit giving to us by our Team Owner Justin Thank you! Very delicious

Post game Spread at home

Custom mitt given to me by Zett

Interesting menu item in the City Hall train station food court

More cool equipment from my teammates

Downtown Ximen


Lamigo Lamigo


2 weeks in Taiwan so far and I’m finally getting settled in. I have recently moved into my apartment which is located about 15 minutes from the field. Prior to moving in I was staying at a gorgeous hotel called the Kuva Chateau. I’m living in a three bedroom apartment with another player, David Welch. He’s a left-handed pitcher from Australia and had played with the Brewers prior to coming out here.

My last start didn’t go as planned. I pitched against the Elephants, who seem to be the Yankees of Taiwan in the sense of their fan base. Their fans come out in large masses and root on their team. I threw 6 innings, giving up 4 runs and took the loss. I had 2 outs in the 4th inning and somehow gave up 3 runs after that. Just needed to make some better pitches.

This week we are having to play our make up games. When games are rained out or delayed over here, they have to be played on the same day of the week as the original game was scheduled as well as in the same stadium. Usually there is a two week break in between the first and second halves, but we have these make up games.

Today we had a spring training type practice. It consisted of the normal conditioning, fundamentals, base running, bunt defense, and after lunch we had batting practice. With the number of injuries we have currently, the front office staff is allowing for the minor league players to come join our team and play with us. Hopefully they will take advantage of their time, play well, and learn from the others. Our minor league team has some young and exciting players to be on the look out for.

Went to the mall yesterday. Just like any other mall in the world. The only difference is the clothing sizes are very different. For men I don’t believe I could find anything in my size. Even when I arrived and was asked my size for shirts and uniforms, I said large or XL. I was then giving a 3XL shirt which fit like a large. The styles I’ve noticed out here so far are very loud (colorful) shoes and clothing. Young female adults like wearing knee high socks that are the same color or completely different. The biggest trend right now or around town are black “sunglasses/eyeglasses” without any frame in them. So it just looks like a halloween professor costume piece.

Also had a chance to goto Taipei and checked out the Night Market and the electronics market.

Here is a link of a Video from my night in Taipei    http://www.twitvid.com/GTBWF

Now onto the fans questions…..

-currently we are on a 5 man rotation, but only play 3-4 games a week, so the pitchers usually have 6-7 days in between starts.

-our teammates embrace american players very well. As much as we are trying to learn new things and techniques, they want to learn from us too.

-hardest and most expensive part being here is getting cabs to and from the field every single day.

-Scooters are everywhere here. I wish I had my 1999 yahama jog here with me. I’m still seeing if I can find a place to rent a scooter or borrow someones around town. anyone that can help I would really appreciate it.

-There are the normal Mcdonalds, subway, KFC (or KLC) over here

-We play at 10-12 different stadiums throughout Taiwan with only 4 teams in the league. If we are the home team at an away stadium, our team brings all of our sponsor banners from our outfield and hangs them at the field. The team store also comes on the road.

-Fans come from all over to watch these games. It would be interesting to know how far some travel to witness these games.

-The tv coverage is done extremely well over here. There are tons of camera angles for any play.

-the routine is very similar to the US for pitchers and in between starts. Its up to you when you want to throw your bullpen. Because theres so much rest between starts, I try to get 2 in during the week.

-conditioning is very important over here and they stress it. Usually before we even stretch we run for 15 minutes. Its extremely hot over here and the extra conditioning will help in the long run.

-they stick with the starters for the most part. Not many pitching changes in the game like winterball. They don’t seem to play the matchups all the time, like I have noticed in the DR or Mexico.

-there is one US umpire over here and I have had him for both of my starts. So far the strike zone has been fair and good. The field conditions are usually good, but the mounds are low and usually get holes in the landing spot after an inning or two.

Thanks as always for reading and sharing your comments and questions. I hope I got to everyones questions. Go Lamigo!

Link from my second game
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BkFC0WjN_G0&feature=player_embedded

Link from the first game
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_1IGPk3JhmE&feature=player_embedded

Please follow me on twitter for more updates, pictures, and videos. http://twitter.com/utbaseball30

1st half coming to an end


The first half is coming to an end and we are trying to make a push to win to get an early playoff spot. These last three games against the Lions have been very exciting and tough on us. The fans came out and pushed us to perform, but we had some struggles. We ended up getting swept by them. We are currently 4 games back, but have a couple of make-up games to play and gain some ground.

I threw against the Lions last night for my first start in Taiwan. We played in Pingtong, but were the home team. In this league although there are only 4 teams, but we play in about 12 different stadiums around the island. I kind of like that because it allows me to see the rest of the country. Pingtong is located in the south part of the island. When I stepped out of the bus I was greeted by local kids asking for autographs and fans wishing me good luck for my start. I also noticed how extremely hot and humid it was down there. The stadium is fairly old in the sense that the stands were cement seats. Even with the heat the fans filled the seats and the drums and trumpets were ready to go. I felt good and threw well. I ended up going 7 innings, 2 runs (1 might have been earned), 7 hits, and I believe 5 strikeouts. I left the game with us winning 4-2, but we ended up losing 6-4. It was a lot of fun to pitch in this kind of atmosphere. Like I have said in earlier blogs, these fans have such a respect for the game and are always rooting for you.

Here is a picture of my first line up card

Here is the highlight footage of my first game. Thanks to the fan who sent me this link.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v1SzdcdPwX4&feature=player_embedded#at=52%27

Here are some more interesting things I have noticed or seen over here.

-Our cab driver had a karaoke machine in his car. 2 tvs, 2 microphones. Of course when my American teammates and I stepped in the cab, Achy Breaky Heart comes on and the driver hands me the mic.

-After 10pm our “band” is not allowed to beat the drum or play the instruments to pump up the crowd.

-We stayed in dorms when we went down south to play the Lions at CC Lake.

-There is one American umpire over here, who actually was behind the plate for my game

-When we lose we have a team meeting after the game with the manager and coaches to go over the game.

Before we got on the high speed rail I checked out some of the food at the convenient store in the station

For the park and ride system at the rail station they do it a little different. Maybe this is where all the couples come to make out.

Always good to see a picture of our mascot.

Lets GO HEAT!

Thanks for all the new followers and fans! Please share my blog with your friends, and feel free to ask questions and make comments. I love your feedback.

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Cultural Differences


There are many cultural differences that take place with baseball over here in Taiwan. Just in my couple of days over here I have noticed many differences of the game of baseball.

There is no national anthem played prior to the games.

Taiwans Gatorade type drink in the dugout is called “Pro-Sweat”, has a gross name but its pretty good.

There have been some variations of sunflowers seeds going around which have a sweet taste, but remember don’t spit them on the field. Only on the ground in the dugout or in a cup.

When the umpires come onto the field they bow to the fans and towards the field

When a pitching change is made, the pitching coach will stay on the field and watch the new pitcher warm up.

Also the pitcher leaving the game usually takes the ball with them, rather than hand it off to the manager.

If you think the battle of the bands between FAMU and Southern was good, you should check out our games. On top of each dugout are drums and trumpet players. Non stop for 9 innings this instruments are thumping and blaring while an M.C. is shouting out cheers for the crowd. Each batter has his own anthem. I find myself whistling these tunes hours after the game is over. They are going to be etched in my brain.

Respect is a huge part of Asian culture. Batters when entering the batters box give a hand signal to the pitcher to ask for a moment to set up and feel comfortable in the box. They also signal the umpire for the same respect out of courtesy.

The players over here love their apparel. They have tons of wrist bands, necklaces, and wear enough protective gear on their elbows and shins to be confused with a catcher while up to bat.

After finishing a game both teams go to their foul line and bow to the crowd and then bow to the opposing team.

Following the game we meet in the locker room and go over the game. During these meetings we all have to stand up and listen to the coaches.

Because of the gamble issue that happened within the league a couple years ago (http://jockpost.com/taiwan-baseball-scandal-1919-black-sox-boy-scouts), no cell phones or computers are allowed to be used in the locker room once you arrive. We also are not allowed to play cards, go to casinos, or play the lottery.

CPBL officials stand around the locker room to make sure no gambling or anything illegal takes place.

Also once you are in uniform and at the field, you can not leave the dugout/locker room. If you leave to goto the office or anywhere in the stadium, you can not return to the game.

Today I noticed how strong the Asian work ethic is. I had always heard about the amount of time they put into practices and I can vouch that it is true. They are very precise with the way they go about their work. We were unable to take BP today, and while I was running I noticed a coach hitting our infielders ground balls along the warning track to make sure they got their work in. I never have seen that in the states. They just pay attention to detail and strive to do very well. I commend them for that and hope I can learn some of their ways.

Tonight we lost to the Elephants 9-5. We play them tomorrow, and then have a three game series agains the Lions. I’m scheduled to pitch on Sunday.

Thanks for all the comments from the last blog. I had over 5000 views in a day. Feel free to ask me questions and please share my blog with your friends. Thanks for all the support!

Be sure to follow me on Twitter  http://twitter.com/utbaseball30

Adios DR, Bienvenido a Miami


Well my time in the Dominican was a short one. I only ended up throwing 1.1 innings down there. Our team started to struggle early and there was a lot of pressure from the brass up top, so they were going with their local guys they have had in the past. There were no hard feelings at all, just being in the right place at the wrong time. I need to get out and pitch to show teams what I can do for next season. Our manager Dave Clarke understood where I was coming from and wished me the best. Now that free agency has started I’m trying to get a job, just as most of my friends are as well.

Licey was a great experience and I loved it down there. I hope to go back to the DR to play again in the future. For now there is a chance I may head to Venezuela shortly to play down there. I will keep you all posted via twitter and my blog about those details.

Not much going on in Miami right now. Just staying in shape by going to the gym and working out at local high schools and colleges. Remember it is Movember. Im growing out a mustache along with many other friends and followers to help support cancer that affects men. I may look like a pedophile for a month but all the money raised goes to a great cause. Here is the link to join our team or to make a donation Movember. You can follow the progress of my molest-ache too there. Any donation goes a long way. Thank you for your support.

I’ve been forgetting to post the Shoe of the Day. I did it during the season and stopped for some reason. As you all know I am the co-founder of Superkix.com, and I’m a shoe nut. What do you think about these?

Kix of the Day:  Adidas Jeremy Scott Teddy

Please comment, ask questions, and rate my blog. I really appreciate everyone for supporting and taking the time to read. Chow!

  

Its been awhile, but Im back…Thanks for the twitter questions!


Sorry for the delay in keeping up with my blog. We have had a tedious schedule as we wrap up the season. Finally back in Toledo for a 12 day homestand. We haven’t been playing too well, but hopefully we can finish strong. At this point in the year players are trying get their batting averages up, ERA’s down, and try to show the rovers/scouts they can play somewhere next year. Getting a job in this game is getting very hard, so you must do everything you can to perform your best each time you take the field.

This past week I used the social network site Twitter to ask the fans and followers what topics or questions you would like me to cover in this weeks blog. I received many great questions and hope to cover them all.

I kind of covered the rituals and superstitions earlier this season. Following BP we make our way into the clubhouse. We have a locker room, gym, training room, video room, and tv room.  Most guys venture to the tv room where the pre game spread is out along with two 42” lcd televisions side by side. Jay Sborz or Casey Fien usually pick out a movie to watch prior to the game. The other tv will just play loops of sportscenter until it annoys another teammate and someone asks to change it. At that point by having the tv’s right next to each other, the person who swiftly tries to change the channel ends up changing both tv’s and all hell breaks loose. Latins are screaming in spanish, the americans are cursing one another, and our clubhouse manager has to come to our rescue like someone is tapping out of a UFC fight. 
From there so players move into the locker room to read or play soft toss with sponge balls. Daniel Schlereth was known for throwing the best soft toss in the clubhouse to Jeff Larish and Brent Dlugach. Those guys had some of their best nights at the plate following that work. You must be heads up though walking in and out of that place. You are very likely to get smoked by one of those balls.

When it comes to pranks and gags, Bull Durham and myself lead the group in that category. Bull will light fireworks in the clubhouse and scare you like no other. His voice carries so much that you can probably hear him outside in the stands prior to a game. I always have some gags ready to go for new guys as they join our team initially. I also always have the shaving cream pies ready for our walk off wins.

Handling your ups and downs during the season can be tough. Some guys deal with it quietly and some are very loud and verbal. The key is to minimize your slump. Work with a coach prior to BP, talk with other players, try something new. Your best coach is yourself. We all have gotten to this level for a reason. Normally when we are failing it is something small and can be fixed or adjusted. We just need to realize it and accept what we are doing wrong. But having the staff and supporting cast of our teammates helps making slumps go away sooner.

I have had my great teammates throughout my career. Luke Hochevar was probably one of the hardest working ones. I remember at UT I forgot my wallet in the clubhouse and went back to the field 2 hours after the game, and Hoch’ was practicing dry mechanics in the mirror by himself. He is where he is at for all his hard work and determination. Kurt Suzuki would always cook for me and Jason Windsor so hes one of my favorites. Dallas Braden was one of the funniest teammates ever. The guy is 150 pounds and has jailhouse tattoos all over his body. He was a tough competitor. Don’t look him into the eyes the day he starts. Casey Fien and I get along pretty well. He’s the typical Cali’ laid back guy and I’m the loud Miami (wade, bosch, Lebron kingdom now) guy. Although I can’t pull off wearing a Justin Beiber shirt to the Indy locker room. Sorry Casey had to throw you under the bus. Josh Rainwater is probably the nicest teammate/person ever. I don’t think that guy can ever get mad at a person. We try to test him every now and then, but he won’t budge. He understands the game very well and takes pride in his job. I can go on and on about teammates. I’ve had so many great ones along the way.

Well I hope I covered everything. I hope to keep the blog rolling through the off season and into winterball. Thanks for the continued support. Also I’m trying to get 1000 followers on twitter. If I do I will be shipping out to some followers a Scot Drucker bobble head doll.  Please spread the word.   http://www.twitter.com/utbaseball30